“Release Your Inner Beast” by Carla Rodrigues Now Available

51GWDGzXlWL
Carla Rodrigues, Long-Time ERC Supporter, Publishes New Book:

Release Your Inner Beast: Embrace your Inner Endo Warrior 

In “Release Your Inner Beast”, Carla Rodrigues wholeheartedly reflects on her personal story and challenges faced during her battle with endometriosis.  Within these pages, you’ll find her definition of a fulfilling, happy, and healthy life as she transitions from a young girl with an unexpected diagnosis into an endo-free survivor with a victorious story to tell.

Are you one of the many people that experience a heavy feeling of helplessness and loneliness, no matter how fulfilled you feel in your life?  You put your all into everything you do, day after day, at work, at home, at the gym…but there’s still something missing?

Whether you’ve been diagnosed specifically with endometriosis or another chronic condition, you know someone going through a difficult time medically or in life, or you’re looking for some overall encouragement and need a boost of confidence, you’ve come to the right place.  Immerse yourself into a world where you will find reassurance that you are not alone, regardless of your unique story.  This book holds the key to recognizing your full potential and most of all, putting yourself first.

Join the millions of people who share a common desire to take control of their health and happiness.  Be part of a revolution that understands we all have our own story to tell. Own your story.

Your inner beast is within you, waiting to be discovered.

Purchase “Release Your Inner Beast” Here

Please bookmark the link https://smile.amazon.com/ch/65-0735986 and support us every time you shop!   By purchasing through AmazonSmile, the ERC will receive 0.5% of the purchase price.

www.awarriorwithinyou.com

The ERC Congratulates Bella on “This is Me”

This is Me Fashion_group photo

This is Me Fashion_Bella

Bella B. was a competitive athlete for 9 years, until she was forced to retire due to unexplained, relentless back pain.  Her journey through more than three years of doctor’s appointments, endless tests, and a few misdiagnoses finally resulted in a diagnosis of Endometriosis at 16 years old. It was a difficult decision not to return to sports, but she did not want to allow this disease to define who she is.  She began modeling and pageantry, which led to combing her passion for the stage and her passion to raise awareness about Endometriosis, culminating in “This Is Me Fashion Benefit”, in support of the Endometriosis Research Center.  We are so grateful to and proud of Bella!

“This Is Me Fashion Benefit” had a fantastic turnout of over 250 guests, 6 vendor booths, 10 silent auction items, 6 designers, and 30 models, which was held at the National Hispanic Cultural Center in Albuquerque, NM.  Bella worked with countless community members to create an exciting show to break the stigma of talking about Endometriosis.  She is very active on social media and has had a number of people reach out to chat about Endometriosis.  She will graduate from high school this year and has applied to medical school, as she hopes to become a gynecologist, specializing in the excision of endometriosis. Congratulations, Bella!

Lupron: A poor diagnostic tool

stop-using-lupron-as-a-diagnostic-tool-218x218

In my work with The Endometriosis Network Canada, I have heard many women say that their doctors told them that if their pain does not go away on Lupron, then the pain must not be from endometriosis. Lupron never has and never will be an effective tool for diagnosing whether pain is due to endometriosis. Not only does Lupron have the potential for significant side effects, which alone should abrogate its use as a diagnostic tool, but it also is not at all effective at diagnosing endometriosis and distinguishing it from other conditions.

Lupron is a synthetic version of a naturally occurring hormone called gonadotropin-releasing hormone, and its action is actually stronger than the naturally occurring GnRH. It is a long-acting medication that initially stimulates hormones in the pituitary gland that control the menstrual cycle, and then suppresses these functions. It is typically given as a 1 month or 3 month injection.

 

Read more of the original article By: Mar 14, 2016 by 

Is life long pain a given?

Acute pain in a woman stomach

Nancy Petersen, RN: While I do not have command of the full literature on pain and its complex underlying issues, I want to address endometriosis generated pain. We often see women in our large Facebook groups resigned to a life of chronic severe pain.

These groups of women number in the 10’s of thousands on the various boards I monitor and counsel. The common denominator is most still have active, inadequately treated endometriosis after experiencing all most all gynecology has to offer. Something is definitely amiss. When a 100,000 patients a week or so are asking for help, for relief, for understanding we have to ask are we really doing enough to relieve pelvic pain?

I think in the presence of endometriosis, given my 30 years of watching the field and advocating/educating women with endometriosis, we should start with the basics. Without a doubt, many of the patients I have seen since the mid 1980’s have had dramatic relief of their endometriosis associated pain, relief which persists today as I still hear from many from time to time. The key seems to be meticulous removal of disease. Key factors seem to be the surgeons understanding of what endo looks like through all of its evolution in color appearance and the statistical distribution of disease and how that correlates with symptoms. Since endo is a multi-factoral disease, some times multiple specialties are required to adequately address that.

We see some centers utilizing teams of surgeons to see this group of patients, so the individual surgeons become highly skilled through constant exposure to complex cases. For instance a colo-rectal surgeon with repeated exposure to endometriosis of the intestinal tract will learn very quickly that colostomies and ileostomies are largely, (almost always ) unnecessary. Yet if a patient is exposed to a colorectal surgeon with out that team experience, often they are told they will need such an intervention. In any event, lesions on or near the bowel need to be addressed surgically if pain relief is one of the goals as medication does not “clean endo up.” Often patients have been told substantial disease was left on the bowel because it was inoperable. In most cases this would not fit with the experience of those who see this disease every day.

Endo what?

endo-what

It’s Time for a New Normal.

A normal where women with endometriosis know the facts and can make empowered choices. A normal that doesn’t involve multiple doctors, surgeries, misdiagnoses and years of pain.

The only film of its kind, Endo What presents solid, accurate information straight from the experts. They answer the questions you have, but aren’t able to ask.

They answer the questions you never even knew to ask.

Just one Caveat. (Spoiler alert)

There’s no quick fix. No easy answer. But, it is possible. You can live a full, vibrant life with endometriosis. You may have endo, but endo does not have you.

It’s time to make a real & lasting change in the narrative of this disease. It’s time to stop the vicious cycle of misinformation. The new normal starts now. It starts here with you.

Take this film & take control of your life.

Every Girl. Every Woman.

An estimated 176 million women around the world have endometriosis. Our goal is to reach every one of them.

You can help make that happen. When you buy the film, , choose to donate a DVD to a school or library. You say where or we’ll pick from our list, then send it on your behalf.

What is Endometriosis?